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Project Update

Started by JugNut, September 11, 2014, 12:50:29 AM

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Dingo

Sorry about your Mom and your sickness Kashi.  Broken bones are a major risk as we get older and it has widespread consequences.  I hope both you and tyour Mom get better soon.


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Daniel

Hi Kashi.
Sorry to hear about your mum.
I hope she recovers well.
:greet

kashi

#17
Thank you all for your kind replies.

Ah, Daedelus also warned Icarus not to fly too low, because feathers would get wet.

Lampos and Phaeton pull my chariot across the sky every morning, preparing the way for my brother Helios. When energy is right, then every day is fresh and new!

Yay, keep on sprinkling me with magic dust, then heart full of love needs no wings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ak7MDJSw9sc

Of course, too much pleasure and no pain ends up dulling the senses. To freshen them up I can recommend galvanic electrolysis of the top lip. The area under the nose is the worst. Or perhaps the best for a committed masochist. Imagine blue bottle stingers and wasp stings mixed together and injected into your skin. Yeeha, it really wakes you up and the pain to the wallet* is icing on the cake.

*e.g. 5 hrs Electrolysis session (32 probe cycle) = $808

Dingo

I learnt something about the Work unit names in Climate Prediction.  The 12 in this file name means that there are 12 trickles for this work unit.  hadam4_a07r_209310_12_838_011900585_0    https://www.cpdn.org/result.php?resultid=21753357

The estimate for the WU in about 4 days or 14,400 minutes so I should get a trickle about every 1200 minutes or 20 or so hours.  I got my first trickle a bit longer than that but it is running on an old slow laptop, but at least I got a tricke.   I am going to run climate prediction on my laptop on my trip next year as the tasks go for a long time and I will not have much wifi on the ship to send and receive work on other projects.



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Have a look at the BOINC@AUSTRALIA Facebook Page and join and also the Twitter Page.

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Have a look at my  Web Cam of Parliament House Ottawa, CANADA

Dingo

#19
If you voted for BOINC or Numberfields then you can't vote for this because they are both in section "AL C7. E-Science"

Quote[Climateprediction.net] BOINC Needs Votes at a UN Upcoming Forum
BOINC is a finalist for an notable award, and needs your vote (*by Sunday)

The World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) (https://www.itu.int/net4/wsis/forum/2024) is a United Nations-sponsored initiative aimed at harnessing the potential of information and communication technologies to build inclusive and equitable information societies worldwide. BOINC has been nominated for a prize at the 2024 forum (https://www.itu.int/net4/wsis/stocktaking/Prizes/2024), and has passed initial hurdles; the next and last step ("Phase 3") requires public votes. The award would be a very nice boost and validation for BOINC and all our projects; if we can get our communities to vote, we should have a decent shot at this point...

Voting is pretty simple, takes just a few minutes; instructions are here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1x9Xi3tq7Y9dlDD0Xb0Ul0yYCXct5pDqIqssqARxvrXg/edit.

(*The deadline for votes is Sunday: 31 March 2024, 23:00 UTC+02:00)

View article · Tue, 26 Mar 2024 20:30:23 +0000


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Dingo

#20
Only a Linux running on an AMD x86_64 or Intel EM64T CPU 1.13   3 Jun 2024, 15:02:22 UTC
Quote[Climateprediction.net] New batch going out to volunteer's machines: STORMS, investigating how low-pressure systems may change in the future
Project: Quantifying controls on the intensity, variability and impacts of extreme European STORMS
by Clément Bouvier and Victoria Sinclair (University of Helsinki)

Throughout the year, low-pressure systems regularly move across Europe, usually from west to east, bringing cloud, rain and windy weather. Sometimes these weather systems can become very intense, and the winds and rain associated with them can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure, flooding, and can disrupt electricity supply and travel. Although the short-term weather forecasts of these storms are now quite accurate, it still remains uncertain how these storms, and their impacts, are likely to change in the future as our climate changes. Some of this uncertainty is because our understanding of what controls the strength and impacts of these storms is incomplete.

The aim of this project is to understand what controls the strength and structure of these low-pressure systems. We will quantify how the atmospheric state that the low-pressure systems develop in affects the strength and structure of these low-pressure systems. This atmospheric state can be described by various parameters, for example, the mean temperature, moisture content, and upper-level wind speeds (i.e. the strength and width of the jet stream). Since there are lots of different parameters we want to study (not just the ones described above), we want to do lots of experiments in a high controlled manner. Therefore, we will run a large ensemble of simulations of idealised low-pressure systems using the numerical weather prediction model OpenIFS. Although the simulations are idealised, the weather systems that develop look very like real weather systems that we observed in reality. Each ensemble member differs in its initial atmospheric state, and we choose these initial states to cover everything from the current climate to past pre-industrial climates to the most extreme future climate projections. This is exciting because although idealised simulations of low-pressure systems have been performed before, this is the first time that such an extensive exploration of the parameter space will be conducted.

Once we have the results from the large ensemble, we will calculate different measures of the strength of the storms and then use machine learning techniques to see how these relate to the initial states. Our results will hopefully increase in confidence in how these storms and their impacts will change in the future.

Technical information:
Run time: between 8 and 9 hours for 1 workunit (1 core, Xeon Gold 6230)
Number of files: 480 files
Maximum size of individual files: 1.3MB for 2D fields output files, 13.3MB for spectral output files, 7.1MB for 3D fields output files
Total disk load: 2.0GB

View article · Wed, 12 Jun 2024 19:58:43 +0000


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Have a look at the BOINC@AUSTRALIA Facebook Page and join and also the Twitter Page.

Proud Founder and member of BOINC@AUSTRALIA

My Luck Prime 1,056,356 digits.
Have a look at my  Web Cam of Parliament House Ottawa, CANADA

Dingo

Quote[Climateprediction.net] New batch going out to volunteer's machines: STORMS, investigating how low-pressure systems may change in the future
Project: Quantifying controls on the intensity, variability and impacts of extreme European STORMS
by Clément Bouvier and Victoria Sinclair (University of Helsinki)

Throughout the year, low-pressure systems regularly move across Europe, usually from west to east, bringing cloud, rain and windy weather. Sometimes these weather systems can become very intense, and the winds and rain associated with them can cause damage to buildings and infrastructure, flooding, and can disrupt electricity supply and travel. Although the short-term weather forecasts of these storms are now quite accurate, it still remains uncertain how these storms, and their impacts, are likely to change in the future as our climate changes. Some of this uncertainty is because our understanding of what controls the strength and impacts of these storms is incomplete.

The aim of this project is to understand what controls the strength and structure of these low-pressure systems. We will quantify how the atmospheric state that the low-pressure systems develop in affects the strength and structure of these low-pressure systems. This atmospheric state can be described by various parameters, for example, the mean temperature, moisture content, and upper-level wind speeds (i.e. the strength and width of the jet stream). Since there are lots of different parameters we want to study (not just the ones described above), we want to do lots of experiments in a high controlled manner. Therefore, we will run a large ensemble of simulations of idealised low-pressure systems using the numerical weather prediction model OpenIFS. Although the simulations are idealised, the weather systems that develop look very like real weather systems that we observed in reality. Each ensemble member differs in its initial atmospheric state, and we choose these initial states to cover everything from the current climate to past pre-industrial climates to the most extreme future climate projections. This is exciting because although idealised simulations of low-pressure systems have been performed before, this is the first time that such an extensive exploration of the parameter space will be conducted.

Once we have the results from the large ensemble, we will calculate different measures of the strength of the storms and then use machine learning techniques to see how these relate to the initial states. Our results will hopefully increase in confidence in how these storms and their impacts will change in the future.

Technical information:
Run time: between 8 and 9 hours for 1 workunit (1 core, Xeon Gold 6230)
Number of files: 480 files
Maximum size of individual files: 1.3MB for 2D fields output files, 13.3MB for spectral output files, 7.1MB for 3D fields output files
Total disk load: 2.0GB

View article · Wed, 12 Jun 2024 19:58:43 +0000


Radioactive@home graph
Have a look at the BOINC@AUSTRALIA Facebook Page and join and also the Twitter Page.

Proud Founder and member of BOINC@AUSTRALIA

My Luck Prime 1,056,356 digits.
Have a look at my  Web Cam of Parliament House Ottawa, CANADA